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  • President Donald Trump is tweeting that US policy on North Korea has been unsuccessful, and that America has given "billions of dollars'' and received nothing in return.
  • Trump's recent tweets on North Korea have prompted questions about whether the president is leaning toward military action.
  • On 7 oct, Trump said US "negotiators'' were made to look like fools and "only one thing will work.'' One prominent Senate Republican, Bob Corker, told The New York Times that he is concerned that Trump could set the US "on the path to World War III.''
  • On 9 oct, Trump tweeted: "Our country has been unsuccessfully dealing with North Korea for 25 years, giving billions of dollars and getting nothing. Policy didn't work!''

  • President Donald Trump has told congressional leaders that his hard-line immigration priorities must be enacted in exchange for extending protection from deportation to hundreds of thousands of young immigrants, many of whom were brought to the US illegally as children.
  • Trump's list of demands included overhauling the country's green-card system, a crackdown on unaccompanied minors entering the country, and building his promised wall along the southern border.
  • Many were policies Democrats have said explicitly are off the table and threaten to derail ongoing negotiations over legislation protecting young immigrants known as "Dreamers."
  • They had been given a reprieve from deportation and the ability to work legally in the country under President Barack Obama's Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, program, which Trump ended last month. In a letter to House and Senate leaders released by the White House on 8 oct, Trump said the priorities were the product of a "a bottom-up review of all immigration policies" that he had ordered "to determine what legislative reforms are essential for America's economic and national security.
  • "These findings outline reforms that must be included as part of any legislation addressing the status of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) recipients," he wrote, adding that: "Without these reforms, illegal immigration and chain migration, which severely and unfairly burden American workers and taxpayers, will continue without end."

  • North Korean leader Kim Jong Un said his nuclear weapons are a "powerful deterrent" which guarantee North Korea's sovereignty, state media reported on 9 oct, hours after US President Donald Trump said "only one thing will work" in dealing with the isolated country.
  • Trump did not make clear to what he was referring, but his comments seemed to be a further suggestion that military action was on his mind.
  • In a speech to a meeting of the powerful Central Committee of the ruling Workers' Party on 7 oct, a day before Trump's most recent comments, state media said Kim had addressed the "complicated international situation". North Korea's nuclear weapons are a "powerful deterrent firmly safeguarding the peace and security in the Korean peninsula and Northeast Asia," Kim said, referring to the "protracted nuclear threats of the US imperialists."
  • In recent weeks, North Korea has launched two missiles over Japan and conducted its sixth nuclear test, and may be fast advancing toward its goal of developing a nuclear-tipped missile capable of hitting the US mainland. North Korea is preparing to test-launch such a missile, a Russian lawmaker who had just returned from a visit to Pyongyang was quoted as saying on 6 oct.
  • Donald Trump has previously said the United States would "totally destroy" North Korea if necessary to protect itself and its allies.
  • The situation proved that North Korea's policy of "byungjin", meaning the parallel development of nuclear weapons and the economy was "absolutely right", Kim Jong Un said in the speech

  • US economist Richard Thaler won the 2017 Nobel Economics Prize for his contributions in the field of behavioural economics, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said on 9oct.
  • "In total, Richard Thaler's contributions have built a bridge between the economic and psychological analyses of individual decision-making," the award-giving body said on announcing the 9 million Swedish crown ($1.1 million) prize.
  • "His empirical findings and theoretical insights have been instrumental in creating the new and rapidly expanding field of behavioural economics, which has had a profound impact on many areas of economic research and policy."
  • The economics prize, officially called the Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel, was established in 1968.

  • The US State Department has approved the possible sale of a THAAD anti-missile defense system to Saudi Arabia at an estimated cost of $15 billion, the Pentagon said on 6 oct, citing Iran among regional threats.
  • The approval opens the way for Saudi Arabia to purchase 44 Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) launchers and 360 missiles, as well as fire control stations and radars.
  • "This sale furthers US national security and foreign policy interests, and supports the long-term security of Saudi Arabia and the Gulf region in the face of Iranian and other regional threats," the Pentagon's Defense Security Cooperation agency said in a statement.
  • Saudi Arabia and the United States are highly critical of what they consider Iran's aggressive behavior in the Middle East.Iran also has one of the biggest ballistic missile programs in the Middle East, viewing it as an essential precautionary defense against the United States and other adversaries, primarily Gulf Arab states and Israel.
  • THAAD missile systems are deployed to defend against ballistic missile attacks.
  • Saudi-owned al Arabiya television reported on Thursday that the kingdom had agreed to buy Russian S-400 surface-to-air missile systems, an announcement that came as Saudi King Salman made during his visit to Russia, the first by a Saudi monarch.

  • Russian air strikes killed 14 civilians as they were crossing the Euphrates river near the jihadist-held town of Mayadeen in eastern Syria, the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said on 6 oct.
  • "They were crossing the river on makeshift rafts in a village south of Mayadeen," Observatory director Rami Abdel Rahman said, adding that three children were among those killed overnight.
  • Russia has in recent days intensified its air raids in support of Syrian regime forces battling jihadists across the country.
  • Abdel Rahman said the civilians were fleeing the village of Mahkan, south of Mayadeen, which lies about 420 kilometres east of Damascus and is one of the Islamic State group's main remaining bastions.
  • Mayadeen has been under IS control since 2014, when the group swept across swathes of Iraq and Syria and proclaimed a "caliphate", but regime forces this week advanced to within five kilometres of the town.

  • The International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN) won the Nobel Peace Prize on 6 oct, as the Norwegian Nobel Committee warned that the risk of a nuclear conflict is greater than for a long time.
  • The Nobel Peace Prize, worth nine million Swedish crowns ($1.10 million), will be presented in Oslo on December 10.
  • ICAN describes itself as a coalition of grassroots non-government groups in more than 100 nations. It began in Australia and was officially launched in Vienna in 2007.
  • "We live in a world where the risk of nuclear weapons being used is greater than it has been for a long time," said Berit Reiss-Andersen, the leader of the Norwegian Nobel Committee.
  • In July, 122 nations adopted a UN Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons, but nuclear-armed states including the United States, Russia, China, Britain and France stayed out of the talks.
  • The Nobel prize seeks to bolster the case of disarmament amid nuclear tensions between the United States and North Korea and uncertainty over the fate of a 2015 deal between Iran and major powers to limit Tehran's nuclear programme.
  • US President Donald Trump has called the Iran agreement the "worst deal ever negotiated" and a senior administration official said on 5 oct that Trump is expected to announce soon that he will decertify the landmark pact.

  • A crucial piece of British-Indian heritage could be obliterated if plans to refurbish a club where figures in India's independence movement gathered go through.
  • Marston Properties, a property management company , has submitted plans to partially demolish and remodel the eight-storey Edwardian building, which houses the India Club on London's Strand, to make way for a 30-bedroom modern hotel. The firm has free hold rights over the building.
  • The India Club first opened in 1946 and was a hub for Indian nationalists, intellectuals and politicians pre-Independence. Established by V K Krishna Menon, India's first high commissioner to the UK, it served as a meeting venue of the India League, a British organisation which campaigned for Indian independence.
  • The league evolved from the Commonwealth of India League and Annie Besant's Home Rule for India League.The club's founding members included Lady Edwina Mountbatten and Jawaharlal Nehru.
  • Post-Independence, it became a private members' club to bring a better understanding between India and the UK. Visitors included intellectuals such as Bertrand Russell and Harold Laski, and politicians such as Indira Gandhi. Soaked in history, the club retains its 1940s colonial charm and features, right down to the simple wooden formica tables and green padded chairs.
  • Paintings by M F Husain and portraits of Mahatma Gandhi, Dadabhai Naoroji, Julius Silverman and Indira Gandhi adorn the walls. Nowadays it is open to all and frequented by Indian expats and diplomats.

  • A personal globe belonging to German dictator Adolf Hitler has been sold for $65,000 at an auction in the US.
  • The personal terrestrial globe, a unique relic, was taken as a souvenir from Hitler's residence at Berchtesgaden in Germany on May 10, 1945 by John Barsamian, an American soldier at the end of the World War II.
  • The globe is mounted on a wood base with a metal half- meridian attached at the north and south poles, and stands 18 inches high in all, with a diameter at the equator of over 12 inches, according to Live Auctioneers in the US.
  • The globe is marked entirely in German. Notably, the borders of Germany include the portion of Poland allotted to them under the German-Soviet Frontier Treaty of 1939, as well as Austria and the Czech Sudetenland, the auction house said.
  • The globe is accompanied by a letter written by Barsamian to his family, dated May 10, 1945.
  • "I am going to tell you something now that I bet will really surprise you. On 4 oct I went and visited Adolph Hitler's Home at Berchtesgaden in the Alps. The place had been bombed, however, parts were still standing," Barsamian wrote.
  • "It was really some thrill to walk all around Berchtesgaden and look out over the majestic Alps and think that just a short while ago Adolph Hitler stood where I am standing and looked over the countryside," he wrote.The globe was auctioned for $65,000, the auction house said.
  • A monogrammed dress shirt belonging to Hitler with the initials "A H" printed was also sold at the auction for $10,000.

  • Pakistan's intelligence agency clearly has links with terrorist groups+ , said the US Joint Chiefs of Staff chairman General Joseph Dunford on 3 oct, according to Washington publication The Hill.
  • US defense secretary James Mattis went a step further and said that Pakistan's Inter-Services Intelligence even "appears to run its own policy".
  • Both officials were testifying at the US Senate Armed Services Committee on the US's strategy in Afghanistan . On the same day, they also testified at the House Armed Services Committee on the same subject.
  • "We've seen the government of Pakistan come down on terrorists, when the ISI appears to run its own policy," said Mattis, according to Russia on 4 oct.
  • When asked if taking away Pakistan's status as a major non-Nato ally is an option on the table if it doesn't act to immediately to rein in terror, Mattis's response was, "sure it will be."
  • Pakistan, of course, continues to deny there is state or institutional support for terrorists, but the US isn't buying that falsehood, said Dunford."It is clear to me that the Inter-Services Intelligence has connections with terrorist groups," said Dunford, in his testimony at the Senate hearing.
  • Still, both Dunford and Mattis said they're willing to work with Pakistan "one more time" before taking punitive measures against the country.
  • "We need to try one more time to make this strategy work with them, by, with and through the Pakistanis, and if our best efforts fail, President (Donald) Trump is prepared to take whatever steps are necessary," said Mattis said at the House hearing, reported The Hill.

  • Scientists Rainer Weiss, Barry Barish and Kip Thorne won the 2017 Nobel Prize for Physics for decisive contributions in the observation of gravitational waves, the award-giving body said on 3 oct.
  • "This is something completely new and different, opening up unseen worlds," the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said in a statement on awarding the 9 million Swedish crown ($1.1 million)prize.
  • "A wealth of discoveries awaits those who succeed in capturing the waves and interpreting their message."
  • Physics is the second of this year's crop of Nobel Prizes and comes after Americans Jeffrey Hall, Michael Rosbash and Michael Young were awarded the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine on 2 oct.

  • Rob Ledbetter's battlefield instincts kicked in quickly as bullets rained overhead.
  • The 42-year-old US Army veteran who served as a sniper in Iraq immediately began tending to the wounded, one of several heroes to emerge from the deadliest mass shooting in modern US history. Amid the massacre in Las Vegas, which left 59 people dead and more than 500 injured, there were acts of compassion and countless heroics that officials say saved scores of lives.
  • There was a man one survivor knows only as Zach who herded people to a safe place. There was a registered nurse from Tennessee who died shielding his wife.
  • Like many people in the crowd of some 22,000 country music fans Sunday night, Ledbetter heard the pop-pop-popping noise and figured it was fireworks. Then he saw people dropping to the ground. When more booms echoed in the night air, he recognized the sound of automatic weapons fire.
  • The gunman, identified as Stephen Craig Paddock, a 64-year-old retired accountant from Mesquite, Nevada, created his own sniper's perch inside the 32nd floor room at the Mandalay Bay casino hotel, across from the concert grounds. He appeared to fire unhindered for more than 10 minutes, according to radio traffic, and then killed himself before officers stormed in and found 23 firearms.

  • Absconding liquor baron Vijay Mallya, who is wanted in connection to a loan default case to the tune of Rs 9,000 crore, was arrested in London, Doordarshan News reported on 3 oct.
  • The fugitive businessman has been arrested in connection to a money laundering case. He will shortly be produced before a court for a hearing.
  • Mallya owes as much as Rs 9,000 crore to Indian banks. He has been out on bail after Scotland Yard arrested him on April 18 this year, acting on India's formal extradition request for him. The 61-year-old chief of the now-defunct Kingfisher Airlines fled India last year in March and has been living in Britain since then.
  • The Central Bureau of Investigation (CBI) and Enforcement Directorate (ED) had recently uncovered that Mallya had diverted a major chunk of a Rs 6,027 crore loan, taken from a consortium of 17 banks led by SBI, to several countries including US, UK, France and Ireland.
  • Both the agencies are now planning to file chargesheets against him and present it as evidence in the Westminster Magistrates' Court, so that his extradition could be expedited.
  • India had given a formal extradition request for Mallya as per the Extradition Treaty between India and the UK through a note verbale on February 8 and had asserted that it has a "legitimate" case against him.

  • At least 50 people were killed and more than 400 injured when a gunman opened fire on a country music festival in Las Vegas Strip on 1 oct, raining down bullets from the 32nd floor of a hotel for several minutes before he was shot dead by police.
  • The death toll, which police emphasized was preliminary, would make the attack the deadliest mass shooting in US history, eclipsing last year's massacre of 49 people at an Orlando night club.
  • Some 22,000 people were in the crowd when the man opened fire, sending panicked people fleeing the scene, in some cases trampling one another, as law enforcement officers scrambled to locate and kill the gunman. Shocked concertgoers, some with blood on their clothes, wandered the streets after the attack.
  • At least 406 people were taken to area hospitals with injuries, the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police said.
  • Police identified the gunman as area resident Stephen Paddock, 64, and said they had no information yet about his motive.
  • He was not believed to be connected to any militant group, Clark County Sheriff Joseph Lombardo told reporters.
  • "We have no idea what his belief system was," Lombardo said. "We've located numerous firearms within the room that he occupied."
  • Authorities had earlier regarded Paddock's roommate, Marilou Danley, as a person of interest, but later on 2 oct said they no longer regarded her as related to the case, CNN and Fox News reported, citing police sources.

  • India on Sunday received its first ever shipment of US crude oil with state-owned Indian Oil Corp (IOC) importing a 1.6 million barrels parcel at Paradip in Odisha.
  • MT New Prosperity, a very large crude carrier (VLCC), with a capacity to haul two million barrels of crude, left US Gulf Coast on August 19 and arrived at Paradip port.
  • "IOC will process the crude at its refineries located at Paradip, Haldia (in West Bengal), Barauni (in Bihar) and Bongaigaon (in Assam)," the company said in a statement.
  • A function was held at the Paradip port to mark the arrival, which was attended by officials of IOC, oil ministry and the US Embassy.
  • "IOC, which became the first Indian public sector refiner to source US crude, has placed a cumulative order 3.9 million barrel (of US crude)," it said.
  • State-owned Bharat Petroleum Corp Ltd (BPCL) and Hindustan Petroleum Corp Ltd (HPCL) have also placed orders for about 2.95 million barrels and 1 million barrels of US crude respectively for their Kochi and Vizag refineries.
  • "The total volume of the crude presently contracted by Indian public sector refineries is, therefore, 7.85 million barrels," the statement said.
  • This is one of the first shipments to India since the United States stopped oil exports in 1975, and follows recent commitments to US oil purchases by Indian state refiners, a separate statement issued by US Embassy said.
  • "US crude oil shipments to India have the potential to boost bilateral trade by up to $2 billion," the Embassy statement said.

  • Nissan said 2 oct it was recalling some 1.2 million cars in Japan that had failed to meet domestic rules on final vehicle inspections.
  • The announcement came after Nissan's shares slumped in Tokyo 2 oct on reports that tests were performed by staff who were not certified to check the vehicles to Japanese government standards.
  • Nissan fell by more than five per cent in early trade before ending the day down 2.69 percent at 1,084.5 yen.
  • Nissan president Hiroto Saikawa said junior inspectors were performing tasks they were not certified to do, calling it a "very serious problem".
  • "Rather than officially certified inspectors, those supporting them performed the task," he told reporters at the company's headquarters in Yokohama near Tokyo."They were not one-off, accidental incidents," he added.
  • The affected vehicles were built between October 2014 and September 2017, Nissan said."When and where and how these things started happening, even someone in my position cannot say," Saikawa said."I want to get to the bottom of this myself."
  • While the inspections did not meet the requirements of Nissan's home market, "we're sure the vehicles that were shipped were safe and secure", he added.The costs of the recall were likely to be about 25 billion yen ($222 million), Saikawa said.
  • Nissan said in a statement that a team including an independent third party "is currently investigating the causes and measures to prevent recurrence"."Nissan regrets any inconvenience and concern this has caused to its valued customers in Japan," the statement added.

  • British Prime Minister Theresa May's Conservative Party gathers today for its annual conference, dominated by questions about her leadership and splits on Brexit.
  • Four months after losing her parliamentary majority in a June snap election, May's grip on power remains fragile.
  • In Brussels, Brexit negotiations are moving painfully slowly, while at home, ministers still disagree on the shape of Britain's future outside the European Union.
  • Ahead of her arrival in Manchester, northwest England, May acknowledged the "disappointing" election performance, but emphasised that she had a programme that she intended to see through.
  • "Yes, we have to get the best Brexit deal but we must also take action here at home to make this a fairer place to live for ordinary working people," she said.
  • Commentators will be watching for signs of rebellion, however, with all eyes on Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson.
  • His decision to set out his own vision of a clean break with the EU, just days before May's big Brexit speech in Florence, was widely viewed as a challenge to her authority.
  • "May needs to get through conference without further damage to her position," said Simon Usherwood, a politics expert at the University of Surrey.

  • Pakistan received a proposal to swap Indian national Kulbhushan Jadhav for a terrorist who carried out the horrific 2014 Peshawar school attack and is now jailed in Afghanistan, foreign minister Khwaja Muhammad Asif has claimed.
  • Asif, however, did not specify the name of the terrorist and the National Security Advisor who had made the proposal.
  • "The terrorist who killed children in APS (Army Public School) in Peshawar is in Afghan custody. The National Security Advisor (NSA) told me that we can exchange that terrorist with the terrorist you have, which is Kulbhushan Jadhav," Asif told the audience after his speech at the Asia Society here on 27 sep.
  • He discussed Pakistan's vision for and approach towards regional peace and development during his conversion with author and journalist Steve Coll.Asif said Pakistan had suffered grievously from conflict and instability in Afghanistan.
  • "Unless this cycle is reversed, we would continue to bear the brunt. No country, therefore, has a larger stake in seeing peace and stability return to Afghanistan than Pakistan. Regrettably, the situation in Afghanistan is getting worse," he said.
  • Jadhav, a 46-year-old retired Indian Navy officer, was in April sentenced to death by Pakistan's Field General Court Martial on charges of his alleged "involvement in espionage and sabotage activities" against Pakistan.
  • Asif said there was no military solution to Afghanistan. He said Pakistan had in the past done all it could to facilitate a political settlement."We have also done all that we could to make sure that Pakistani soil is not used against any country," he claimed.
  • "However, there are obviously clear limits to what we can do. We cannot take responsibility for Afghanistan's peace and security and be asked to achieve what the combined strength of some of the most powerful and richest countries could not accomplish," Asif said.

  • Malaysia has banned its citizens from traveling to North Korea as the country faces increasing diplomatic pressure over its weapons programs.
  • The foreign ministry announced the ban in a statement 28 sep and said it would last until further notice.
  • The statement cited North Korea's missile tests and related developments. North Korea has been targeted in recent months by stricter sanctions and increasing diplomatic pressure, with Kuwait and Mexico expelling its envoys in recent weeks.
  • Since July, North Korea has launched its first intercontinental ballistic missiles, has flown midrange missiles over Japan and has detonated its sixth nuclear test.
  • Malaysia is one of its few remaining diplomatic partners even though bilateral tensions briefly escalated after the North Korean leader's estranged half-brother was killed at the Kuala Lumpur airport in February.

  • British jeweller Graff said Tuesday it has purchased the world's largest uncut diamond roughly the size of a tennis ball for $53 million (44.5 million euros).
  • Canadian miner Lucara Diamond sold to Graff the 1,109-carat gem, the Lesedi La Rona, which was found in Botswana's Karowe mine in late 2015
  • "We are thrilled and honoured to become the new custodians of this incredible diamond," said company chairman, Laurence Graff, in a statement.
  • "The stone will tell us its story, it will dictate how it wants to be cut, and we will take the utmost care to respect its exceptional properties."
  • Lucara confirmed the hefty price tag in a statement issued in Vancouver."The discovery of the Lesedi La Rona was a company defining event for Lucara," said William Lamb, president and chief executive of Lucara.
  • "It solidified the amazing potential and rareness of the diamonds recovered at the Karowe mine."The rough diamond had previously failed to meet its reserve price of more than $70 million at a Sotheby's auction in 2016.

  • India has started to "roll out the red carpet" to UK SMES instead of subjecting them to a barrage of regulations. The move comes as India hopes to ramp up exports from Britain.
  • "Earlier the mindset of the Government was all about being the regulator - these are the rules and constraints and this is the framework the investor must operate in," said Assistant Vice President of Invest India Vivek Abraham. "Now we are trying to change the mindset to ensure that the red carpet is rolled out to all investors," he said at the launch of the Access India Programme at India House in London on 27 sep.
  • The new initiative, launched by the High Commission of India in the UK, with the UK India Business Council, aims to offer a single window of advice to SMEs in the UK looking to export to or invest in India.
  • The market entry support programme offers legal and project financing advice as well as strategic advisory and location services and advice on mergers, acquisitions and government clearances.
  • The programme will identify 50 UK SMES that want to sell their products in India by November. Free workshops will be held and mentoring provided for them next year.
  • Dinesh K. Patnaik, Deputy High Commissioner of India to the UK, told the audience of business leaders: "We want to move from the UK having a slow burning love affair with India to speed dating and speed up the process and help UK SMES find the right way to reach India."
  • He said India was trying to help UK SMES "beat the Brexit blues" and India's understanding of Brexit was that Brexit was "about open Britain. That is what we are hoping for anyway," he said.
  • The UK SMES did not need to have any specific turnover to invest in India, he said. They just needed to have a product and be willing to sell it in India.

  • Saudi Arabia on 26sep announced that women will be allowed to drive for the first time in the ultra-conservative kingdom next summer, fulfilling a key demand of women's rights activists who faced detention for defying the ban.
  • The kingdom was the only the country in the world to bar women from driving and for years had garnered negative publicity internationally for detaining women who defied the ban.
  • The move, which has been welcomed by the United States, represents a significant opening for women in Saudi Arabia, where women's rights have steadily and slowly gained ground over the years. Saudi women remain largely under the whim of male relatives due to guardianship laws.
  • King Salman and his young son and heir, Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, have tested the waters though, allowing women into the country's main stadium in the capital, Riyadh, for national day celebrations this month. The stadium had previously been reserved for all-male crowds to watch sporting events. The king and his son have also opened the country to more entertainment and fun.
  • Women's rights activists since the 1990s have been pushing for the right to drive, saying it represents their larger struggle for equal rights under the law.
  • Some ultraconservative clerics in Saudi Arabia, who wield power and influence in the judiciary and education sectors, had warned against allowing women to drive. They argued it would corrupt society and lead to sin.
  • Women in Saudi Arabia have long had to rely on male relatives to get to work, run errands and simply move around. The more affluent have male drivers and more recently, in major cities, women could access ride hailing apps like Uber and Careem.

  • The United States wants a diplomatic solution to the escalating nuclear crisis with North Korea, defence secretary Jim Mattis said on 26 sep, toning down the shrill rhetoric between the two countries.
  • "We maintain the capability to deter North Korea's most dangerous threats but also to back up our diplomats in a manner that keeps this as long as possible in the diplomatic realm," he said in New Delhi after talks with his Indian counterpart.
  • "That is our goal, to solve this diplomatically, and I believe that President Trump has been very clear on this issue," the US defence chief said.
  • President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un have become embroiled in a bitter war of words after the North detonated its sixth nuclear bomb and test-fired intercontinental missiles saying it needs to defend itself against the threat of a US invasion.
  • Pyongyang's nuclear weapons ambitions including a suggestion last week that it could test an H-bomb over the Pacific has increased international fears of conflict.
  • Alarm over Pyongyang's nuclear and ballistic missile programmes dominated this year's gathering of world leaders at the United Nations General Assembly.

  • The United States will prohibit entry of citizens from North Korea to the United States as part of a sweeping new travel ban that also slaps restrictions on Iran, Chad, Libya, Syria, Venezuela, Yemen and Somalia, the Trump administration said on 24sep.
  • The new restrictions, slated to go into effect on October 18, resulted from a review after President Donald Trump's original travel bans were challenged in court.
  • The addition of North Korea and Venezuela broadens the restrictions from the original, mostly Muslim-majority list.
  • "North Korea does not cooperate with the United States government in any respect and fails to satisfy all information-sharing requirements," the proclamation said.
  • An administration official, briefing reporters on a conference call, acknowledged that the number of North Koreans traveling to the United States now was very low.

  • US President Donald Trump dialled up the rhetoric against North Korea again at the weekend, warning the country's foreign minister that he and leader Kim Jong Un "won't be around much longer", as Pyongyang staged a major anti-US rally.
  • North Korea's foreign minister Ri Yong Ho told the United Nations General Assembly on Saturday that targeting the US mainland with its rockets was inevitable after "Mr Evil President" Trump called Pyongyang's leader a "rocket man" on a suicide mission.
  • "Just heard foreign minister of North Korea speak at UN If he echoes thoughts of Little Rocket Man, they won't be around much longer!" Trump said on Twitter late on 23 sep.
  • Trump and Kim have traded increasingly threatening and personal insults as Pyongyang races towards its goal of developing a nuclear-tipped missile capable of reaching the United States - something Trump has vowed to prevent.
  • Analysts say the escalation in rhetoric is increasing the risk of a miscalculation by one side or the other that could have massive repercussions.
  • North Korea's state-run television KRT aired a video on Sunday showing tens of thousands of people attending an anti-US rally at Kim Il Sung square in Pyongyang.
  • The North's official KCNA news agency said more than 100,000 people gathered for the rally on 23 sep and delivered speeches supporting comments

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