Current Affairs : International
 

  • The UK on 15 Jan scrambled Royal Air Force fighter jets to intercept two Russian bomber planes that were headed towards its airspace over the North Sea, the latest incident involving Russia.
  • Britain's Ministry of Defence (MoD) confirmed that the Quick Reaction Alert (QRA) aircraft took off from Royal Air Force (RAF) base Lossiemouth in north east Scotland, without confirming the exact number of Typhoons involved.
  • "We can confirm that Quick Reaction Alert (QRA) Typhoon aircraft from RAF Lossiemouth scrambled to monitor two Blackjack bombers approaching the UK area of interest," an MoD statement said.
  • "The Russian aircraft were initially monitored by a variety of friendly nation fighters and subsequently intercepted by the RAF in the North Sea. At no point did the Russian aircraft enter sovereign UK airspace," it said.
  • The closest the Russian jets came to the UK land was 40 nautical miles, or around 46 miles and were 30 nautical miles (34.5 miles) from British sovereign airspace.
  • Typhoons are combat aircraft used in air policing and high-intensity conflict. A Voyager refuelling aircraft from the RAF Brize Norton base also supported the Typhoons during the operation
  • RAF Lossiemouth is primarily used as a base for QRA, with pilots on duty 24 hours a day. The latest incident is being seen as part of a number of similar incidents involving Russia.

  • India and Israel on 15 Jan signed nine agreements, including in the areas of cyber security and oil and gas, following delegation-level talks headed by Prime Ministers Narendra Modi and Benjamin Netanyahu here.
  • A memorandum of understanding (MoU) on cooperation in cyber security was signed. A second MoU was signed between the Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas and Israel`s Ministry of Energy in oil and gas sector.
  • A protocol between India and Israel on amendments to the air transport agreement was also signed. Another agreement was on film-co-production between India and Israel.
  • A third MoU between the Central Council for Research in Homeopathy, Ministry of AYUSH and the Centre for Integrative Complementary Medicine, Shaare Zedek Medical Centre of Israel, related to cooperation in the field of research in homeopathic medicine.
  • Another MoU between Indian Institute of Space Science and Technology (IIST) and the Technion- Israel Institute of Technology for cooperation in the field of space was signed.
  • A memorandum of intent was on Invest India and Invest in Israel. Indian Oil and Israel`s Phinergy Ltd signed a letter of intent for cooperation in the area of metal-air batteries.
  • Another letter of intent between Indian Oil and Israel`s Yeda Research and Development Co Ltd was signed for cooperation in the area of concentrated solar thermal technologies.

  • Prime Minister Narendra Modi and his Israeli counterpart Benjamin Netanyahu on 14 Jan attended a ceremony at the Teen Murti Memorial+ here to mark the renaming of Teen Murti Chowk as Teen Murti Haifa Chowk.
  • The two leaders also laid a wreath and signed the visitor's book at the memorial.Netanyahu, who arrived on a six-day visit today, was received by Modi.
  • The three bronze statues at Teen Murti represent the Hyderabad, Jodhpur and Mysore Lancers who were part of the 15 Imperial Service Cavalry Brigade.
  • The brigade carried out the victorious assault on the fortified city of Haifa on September 23, 1918, during World War I.
  • There are various accounts of this battle - all narrate the valour with which the lancers undertook the assault on the garrisoned city protected by a joint force of Ottomans, Germany and Austria-Hungary.
  • The liberation of Haifa cleared a supply route for the Allies to the city through the sea.44 Indian soldiers made the ultimate sacrifice during the liberation of the city in World War I.Till date, the 61 Cavalry celebrates September 23 as its Raising Day or "Haifa Day."

  • Women in black abayas and fluorescent orange vests stood at the gates at King Abdullah Stadium, welcoming people into the family section that, for the first time in Saudi Arabia, allowed women to attend a men's soccer match.
  • As the two teams al-Ahli and al-Batin faced each other in the city of Jeddah, women showed up to their first public sporting event in the Kingdom to support the sides with their spouses, children and friends.
  • The General Sports Authority announced in October that stadiums in Jeddah, Dammam and Riyadh will be set up to accommodate families starting in 2018.
  • Honestly this decision should have happened a long time ago," said Muneera al-Ghamdi, an attendee. "But thank god that it came in the right time, and hopefully what's to come will be even more beautiful for women."
  • The decision to allow women to attend a mixed public sporting event is one of many changes the country has undergone in recent months, hailed as proof of a new progressive trend in the deeply conservative Muslim Kingdom.

  • India and the Maldives pressed the reset button in ties with the latter's foreign minister Mohamed Asim briefing his counterpart Sushma Swaraj and PM Narendra Modi about Male's position on a host of issues that seemed to be plaguing the bilateral relationship in recent times.
  • Asim, who visited India also as President Abdulla Yameen's special envoy, reiterated Male's 'India First' policy and, according to a statement issued by India, emphasised that Maldives attached the highest priority to its ties with India.
  • According to official sources here, Asim did not just assure India that Male will do nothing to jeopardise India's security interests but also said in his meetings with both Modi and Swaraj that the Maldives would expedite work on India's developmental projects which the two countries had announced during Yameen's visit to India. Progress on these projects had been patchy until now.
  • Discussions in Asim's meetings with Modi and Swaraj centred around strengthening of the development partnership between India and Maldives and enhancing defence and security cooperation, said the Indian government.

  • A Saudi private company on 11 jan opened the first car showroom for women only just five months before a decision allowing females to drive takes effect.
  • The showroom was opened in a shopping mall in the western Red Sea port city of Jeddah to allow women the freedom to choose their own cars before they hit the road.
  • In a historic decision late last year, King Salman gave Saudi women the right to drive, abolishing an almost three-decade ban based on religious reasons.
  • Saudi Arabia is the only country that bans women drivers. The landmark royal decree has been hailed as proof of a new progressive trend in the kingdom.
  • The showroom offers a wide selection of vehicles from various makes and is staffed by women only.It also provides women with solutions to finance their purchase provided by leading banks and financial companies.
  • The company plans to open more automobiles showrooms for women in the oil-rich kingdom.
  • Saudi Arabia's cost of living has risen after the government hiked domestic gas prices and introduced value-added tax (VAT) in January.

  • Sri Lanka has revoked a 38-year ban on selling alcohol to women and employing them in places where the drinks are produced and sold.
  • Finance minister Mangala Samaraweera signed the notification revoking the ban to restore gender equality and promote tourism, a government statement said.
  • The ban had been in force since 1979, the early years of Sri Lanka embracing an open market economy. But many businesses had employed women to sell and serve alcohol and sold alcohol to them in spite of the ban.
  • The government also decided to allow liquor outlets to stay open an hour later, until 10pm.
  • The decision could become politically sensitive with clergy in the predominantly Buddhist nation opposing liberalizing alcohol consumption. However, many Sri Lankans consume alcohol

  • The pace of the Indian economy's progress is now among the fastest in the world. While most countries are struggling with economic slowdown or stagnation, India is flying high owing to inherent strengths boosted by the govt's policy interventions.
  • The World Bank in its latest Global Economic Prospects report has said that Indian economy will grow at 7.3% in 2018
  • it will further grow at 7.5% for the next 2 years, It's author said that Indian economy has 'enormous potential'-- and that India will likely register higher growth rate than other major emerging economies in the next decade
  • India will make rapid economic progress on the strength of landmark reforms undertaken in recent years such as GST implimentation, increased digital commerce after demonetisation, increased investment, labour reforms and higher govt spending on education and health.The nation is passing through a transformative phase at this time.

  • The US on 10 Jan issued a new travel advisory for countries including India, which its officials said is "user friendly" as it is based on ready-to-understand level of advice ranging from one to four.
  • India has been ranked Level 2 (exercise increased caution) while Pakistan has been places in Level 3 (reconsider travel). Level 1 advises travllers to exercise normal precaution, while Level 4, which has countries like Afghanistan, recommends "Do Not Travel".
  • Now every country has a travel advisory based on this system, which has replaced all the previous such advisories. "These improvements will provide US citizens with clear, timely, and reliable safety and security information worldwide," the State Department said.
  • Placing India on Level 2, the State Department identified "crime and terrorism" for Americans to exercise increased caution. However, it asks Americans not to travel to Jammu and Kashmir, except for eastern Ladakh and Leh and not to venture within 10 miles of the India-Pakistan border due to the "potential for armed conflict".
  • The State Department explained that while it will issue an overall travel advisory level for every country, levels of advice may vary for specific locations or areas within a country.
  • "Indian authorities report rape is one of the fastest growing crimes in India. Violent crime, such as sexual assault, has occurred at tourist sites and in other locations," the new India travel advisory said.

  • Two 37-year-old British Indian MPs have moved from the backbenches to junior ministerial positions in Theresa May's government reshuffle. Suella Fernandes and Rishi Sunak are the same age and were both elected in 2015. But the reshuffle has come under fire for not making the Cabinet diverse enough.
  • "It is disappointing that there are no new Asian members in the Cabinet and the number has in effect gone done. The Cabinet is not as representative of Britain as it should be," said Operation Black Vote director Simon Woolley. "I am very pleased that the number of Asian MPs with ministerial positions has increased but I am waiting for the day that there is a Prime Minister of Britain of Indian or African descent."
  • Ex-barrister Fernandes has been made parliamentary under-secretary of state at the Department for Exiting the European Union (DExEU) led by Brexit negotiator David Davis. The new role is a step up from her previous low-ranking position of parliamentary private secretary to HM treasury ministers.
  • Another Brexiteer and hedge fund millionaire, Sunak, the son-in-law of Infosys co-founder and billionaire N R Narayana Murthy, has been appointed as parliamentary under-secretary of state at the new ministry of housing.
  • Fernandes's parents immigrated to Britain in the 1960s from Kenya and Mauritius. She grew up in Wembley and studied law at Cambridge. As a backbencher she was head of the European Research Group (ERG), a group of Conservative MPs which supports Brexit and campaigned for the UK to leave the EU.

  • Strengthening ties in counter-terrorism, security and trade will be among the key discussion points during the India-ASEAN Summit that will see participation of leaders of all the ten ASEAN countries, who will also be the chief guests at the Republic Day parade.
  • The highest-level of participation at the summit on January 25, to mark the 25 years of Indo-ASEAN ties, comes in the backdrop of increasing Chinese economic and military assertiveness in the region.
  • Some experts feel that the meet can be an opportunity for India to present itself as a powerful ally to these countries in the strategic areas of trade and connectivity.
  • The visit of the leaders of the ten ASEAN countries to be the chief guests at the Republic Day parade is "unprecedented" and a "landmark" event, Preeti Saran, secretary (east), Ministry of External Affairs, told reporters here.Saran said the leaders will start arriving from January 24.
  • There will be a leaders' retreat during which the leaders will have a "free and frank" discussion on January 25. Following this, a plenary session will take place on the same day, she said
  • Leaders from Thailand, Vietnam, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, Myanmar (Burma), Cambodia, Laos and Brunei will attend the summit.

  • Residents of Ain Sefra in northern Algeria on 7 Jan welcomed the sight of snow in the Sahara, the hottest desert in the world.
  • A rare bout of icy weather hit the town, covering parts of the sandy slopes in snow, even though it melts as temperatures rise during the day.
  • Photographer Hamouda Ben Jerad, who filmed footage of people walking around admiring the sights, said the mixture of sand and snow proved a unique photo opportunity.
  • The town of Ain Sefra is known as the gateway to the Sahara desert.

  • The Sikh Coordination Committee East Coast (SCCEC) and American Gurdwara Parbandhak Committee (APGC) have claimed that 96 gurdwaras in the United States have resolved to ban the entry of Indian officials.
  • The ban will apply to nagar kirtans, or religious processions, as well The move comes days after 14 gurdwaras in Ontario, Canada, banned the entry of Indian diplomatic officials. The UK-based Sikh Federation has also proposed a similar ban. They, however, later clarified that Indian officials could visit the gurdwaras in their personal capacity.
  • SCCEC and AGPC claim themselves to be the largest umbrella organisations of Sikh gurdwaras in the US. The announcement has been made with support of US-based group Sikhs for Justice (SFJ).
  • "We will also initiate legal proceedings against those Indian diplomats who will try to defy this ban," said SFJ legal adviser Gurpatwant Singh Pannun.
  • "Indian government officials and any person/s representing the interests of the Indian government, shall not be allowed to enter the US gurdwaras or to participate in any religious programmes," the resolution reads.

  • In a relief for Indian techies, US authorities on 9 Jan said that the Trump administration is not considering any proposal that would force H-1B visa holders to leave the country.
  • The announcement by the US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) came days after reports emerged that the Trump administration was considering tightening H-1B visa rules that could lead to deportation of 7,50,000 Indians. The reports had said it was mulling ending extensions for H-1B holders.
  • The USCIS "is not considering a regulatory change that would force H-1B visa holders to leave the United States by changing interpretation of section certain language in Section 104 C of the American Competitiveness in the 21st Century Act (AC21) statute that states that USCIS may grant the extensions," an official said
  • This provides for H-1B extensions beyond the 6 year limit.
  • "Even if it were, such a change would not likely result in these H-1B visa holders having to leave the United States because employers could request extensions in one-year increments under section 106(a)-(b) of AC21 instead," Jonathan Withington, Chief of Media Relations at the USCIS, said in a statement.

  • Newly-released videos give a glimpse into the dramatic and severe weather recorded at the peak of New Hampshire's Mount Washington over the past two days when the location was said to be the second-coldest place on Earth.
  • The videos from the Mount Washington Observatory were taken over Saturday and Sunday (January 6 & 7) when the observatory recorded wind-chill temperatures as low as minus 39 degrees Fahrenheit (-39 Celsius).
  • The observatory said in a tweet that Saturday's temperature of -36 Fahrenheit (-38 Celsius) tied it as the second-coldest place on Earth that day.
  • Regional news organizations pointed out that the surface temperature of the red planet would feel warmer by comparison, citing data from the Mars Curiosity rover.
  • One of the observatory videos had a caption that said it was taken during peak gusts of 109 miles an hour, or 175 kilometers.
  • The bitter cold that has gripped much of the United States since the new year will last another day, forecasters said on Sunday, predicting an end to a frigid spell that featured a "bomb cyclone" snowstorm and frozen iguanas falling from trees in Florida.

  • Oprah Winfrey on 7 jan declared a "new day" for women and girls facing down abusive men as her powerful speech to the Golden Globe Awards stirred talk that she has a political future
  • Within moments of the daytime television trailblazer's remarks at the Hollywood gala, effusive fans called for her to challenge President Donald Trump in 2020, although she has given no indication she is interested.
  • The 63-year-old Winfrey, whose former talk show ushered in an era of confessional television and helped make her a billionaire, delivered a forceful but tightly focused speech that brought together issues of gender, poverty and race as she accepted a lifetime achievement award.
  • She saluted the #MeToo movement that has quickly gained steam after revelations of rampant sexual misconduct by film mogul Harvey Weinstein.
  • Paying tribute to Recy Taylor, an African American woman who daringly reported her 1944 gang rape by six white men in Alabama and died last month just short of her 98th birthday, Winfrey deplored "a culture broken by brutally powerful men."

  • The Latest on the presentation of the 75th annual Golden Globe Awards from the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly Hills, California.
  • Allison Janney is the winner of the best supporting film actress Golden Globe Award for her role in 'I, Tonya'
  • Janney won for her portrayal of figure skater Tonya Harding's mother, who unleashes abuse on her daughter to try to make her a better athlete. She thanked co-star Margot Robbie and profusely thanked Harding, who was in the ballroom for Sunday's ceremony.
  • 'Coco' has won the Golden Globe Award for best animated film.
  • The Disney and Pixar collaboration is considered a leading contender for an Academy Award for best animated feature. It tells the story of a Mexican boy who dreams of being a musician despite his family's wishes and falls into the realm of the dead.
  • 'Coco' has drawn widespread praise for the culturally authentic way it presents Mexico's 'Day of the Dead' culture.
  • James Franco has won the Golden Globe Award for best actor in a comedy or musical for his portrayal of the mysterious man who created what many consider the worst movie ever made

  • They say bigger is better, but in the succulent world of cherry tomatoes, one Israeli company is going smaller than ever before.
  • The "drop tomato" is about the size of a blueberry and the Kedma company in the country's southern Arava desert says it is the smallest one ever cultivated in Israel, perhaps even in the world. It's a point of pride in a country known for its agricultural innovation, where fruits and vegetables are taken seriously and where several strands of the cherry tomato were first invented
  • "The idea is that it is comfortable," said Ariel Kidron, a Kedma grower. "You can throw it in a salad, you don't need to cut it. It just explodes in your mouth."
  • The seed, originally developed in Holland, was modified to match the arid growing conditions in southern Israel.
  • Rami Golan, of the Central and Northern Arava Research and Development center, who accompanied the project, said it was definitely the smallest ever to be grown in Israel where tomatoes are incredibly popular.

  • Sports stadiums in Saudi Arabia will open their doors to women to attend football matches for the first time ever on 5 Jan, the government has announced.
  • "The first match that women will be allowed to watch will be Al-Ahli versus Al-Batin on Friday January 12," the ministry of information said in a statement on 8 jan .
  • It said women would also be able to attend a second match on the following day and a third one on January 18.
  • Women from across the vast Gulf kingdom may be able to take advantage of this new freedom as the first match will be held in the capital Riyadh, the second in Jeddah on the Red Sea and the third in the eastern city of Dammam.
  • The kingdom, which has some of the world's tightest restrictions on women, has long barred women from sports arenas by strict rules on segregation of the sexes in public.
  • Under Saudi Arabia's existing guardianship system, a male family member - normally the father, husband or brother - must grant permission for a woman's study, travel and a host of other activities.But the conservative kingdom has in recent months eased some of its most notorious restrictions on women, including the lifting of a driving ban - set to go into effect in June.
  • In September, hundreds of women were allowed to enter a sports stadium in Riyadh, used mostly for football matches, for the first time to mark Saudi Arabia's national day.

  • Saudi Arabia's attorney general confirmed that 11 princes had been arrested after protesting the kingdom's austerity measures and would face trial after "disrupting public peace and order
  • Saudi media on 6 Jan had reported the princes arrested after gathering outside Qasr al-Hokm, a historical palace in Riyadh, in protest against a government decision to stop paying the water and electricity bills of royals.
  • They were also demanding compensation for a death sentence issued against one of their cousins, convicted of murder and executed in 2016, attorney general Saud al-Mojeb said.
  • "Despite being informed that their demands are not lawful, the 11 princes refused to leave the area, disrupting public peace and order," Mojeb said in a statement issued by the information ministry. "Following their arrest, they have been charged on a number of counts in relation to these offences".
  • The 11 are being held at the maximum security Al-Hayer prison, south of Riyadh.
  • Saudi Arabia has introduced a string of austerity measures over the past two years to boost revenues and cut spending as the global slump in oil prices led to ballooning budget deficits.

  • US President Donald Trump's recent outburst on Pakistan will further boost economic and defence ties between Beijing and Islamabad, including China acquiring a Pakistani military base close to Iran's Chabahar port, an official media report said on 5 jan.
  • Trump's January 1 Twitter attack against Pakistan where he accused it of providing safe havens to terrorists appears to be helping boost already close ties between Pakistan and China, a report in the state-run Global Times said.
  • It attributed Islamabad's decision to allow Chinese currency in bilateral trade and financing transactions as China has stepped up its investments in the $50 billion China-Pakistan Economic Corridor.
  • The report quoted a 'Washington Times' report that China is in talks with Pakistan to build its second overseas military base as part of a push for greater maritime capabilities along strategic sea routes.
  • The facility could be built at Jiwani, a port near Iran's Chabahar close to the border in the Gulf of Oman, and is located a short distance from Gwadar in Balochistan province which is currently being developed b Chabahar port being jointly developed by Iran, India and Afghanistan to ensure a trade corridor for Indian exports to Afghanistan.

  • The UN Security Council is planning an emergency meeting about Iran on 5 Jan, after the US asked the world body to show support for Iran's anti-government protesters.
  • With council members divided in their views of the demonstrations that have roiled the Islamic Republic, it's not yet clear how the discussion will take shape or what might come out of it.
  • Alma Konurbayeva, a spokeswoman for current council president Kazakhstan, confirmed that Friday afternoon's meeting is about Iran. The US called on 2 Jan for such a session, but council members could insist on a vote before taking up the topic, and it would take nine of the 15 votes to go forward.
  • "This is a matter of fundamental human rights for the Iranian people, but it is also a matter of international peace and security," the US envoy, Nikki Haley, said in a statement Thursday night. She added that it would be "telling if any country tries to deny the Security Council from even having this discussion."
  • Iran's interior minister said up to 42,000 people took part in the week of protests and unrest sparked by economic woes. At least 21 people have been killed and hundreds arrested. Meanwhile, tens of thousands of people took part in counter-demonstrations 3 Jan backing the clerically overseen government, which has accused the US of instigating the protests.
  • Iran's prosecutor general, Mohammad Jafar Montazeri, said on 4 Jan that an American CIA official was the 'main designer' of the demonstrations. And Iran's UN envoy, Ambassador Gholamali Khoshroo, complained in a letter to the Security Council president Wednesday that US President Donald Trump's 'absurd tweets' had 'incited Iranians to engage in disruptive acts

  • The US has suspended more than $1.15 billion security assistance to Pakistan, accusing Islamabad of harbouring terror groups like the Afghan Taliban and the Haqqani Network within its border and showing unwillingness to take "decisive actions" against them.
  • The freezing of all security assistance to Pakistan comes days after President Donald Trump in a new year tweet accused Pakistan of giving nothing to the US but "lies and deceit" and providing "safe haven" to terrorists in return for $33 billion aid over the last 15 years.
  • Prominent among the suspended amount include $255 million in Foreign Military Funding (FMF) for the fiscal year 2016 as mandated by the Congress.
  • In addition, the Department of Defense has suspended the entire $900 million of the Coalition Support Fund (CSF) money to Pakistan for the fiscal year 2017.
  • "on 5 Jan we can confirm that we are suspending national security assistance only, to Pakistan at this time until the Pakistani government takes decisive action against groups, including the Afghan Taliban and the Haqqani Network.
  • We consider them to be destabilising the region and also targeting US personnel. The US will suspend that kind of security assistance to Pakistan," State Department spokesperson Heather Nauert told reporters.
  • The US, she said, will not be delivering military equipment or transfer security-related funds to Pakistan unless it is required by law.

  • A North Korean missile reportedly crashed into one of its own cities after it failed just minutes following its launch.
  • US officials said the Hwasong-12 intermediate-range ballistic missile (IRBM) was initially thought to have disintegrated mid-flight after it was fired on 28 April last year.
  • However, new data suggests it landed in the city of Tokchon, around 90 miles north of the secretive communist country's capital, Pyongyang. Tokchon has a population of around 200,000
  • The missile likely exploded on impact, causing significant damage to a complex of industrial or agricultural buildings, The Diplomat magazine reported, citing a US intelligence source alongside satellite imagery.
  • After its launch from the Pukchang airfield, the missile flew approximately 24 miles to the north-east, the report stated, adding that it flew no higher than around 43 miles. A US government source said the missile's first stage engines failed around a minute after it was launched.
  • Liquid-fuel missiles can cause massive explosions when they fail, and satellite images from Google Earth taken after the test show a cleared area where a building once stood and damage to a greenhouse caused by debris.

  • "You ask what we've done?... From our bases you carried out 57,800 attacks on Afghanistan...thousands of our civilians and soldiers became victims of the war initiated by you," said Pakistan's foreign minister Khawaja Asif , in a series of emotional tweets that were a response to Donald Trump accusing his country of "lies and deceit".
  • Pakistan's foreign minister repeatedly talked of Pakistanis' sacrifices. And directly in response to Trump's words , said his own version of the US President's "No more!"
  • "Our forces are fighting an unusual war, there is an unending saga of sacrifices. Now, history teaches us not to blindly trust the US. We are feeling sorry they are not happy, but we will not compromise on our dignity anymore," said Asif.
  • Asif began his series of tweets by taking a shot at former dictator Pervez Musharraf, the man in charge of Pakistan when the 9/11 terror attacks occurred in New York.
  • "A ruler surrendered in a single phone call, our country, we went through the worst bloodbath," said Asif, about the military dictator Musharraf.
  • Asif implied that if anyone was a fool it was Pakistan for getting involved in the US's war. He was talking about Trump saying in his first tweet of 2018 that Islamabad plays Americans for fools.
  • "The United States has foolishly given Pakistan more than 33 billion dollars in aid over the last 15 years, and they have given us nothing but lies & deceit, thinking of our leaders as fools. They give safe haven to the terrorists we hunt in Afghanistan, with little help. No more!," tweeted Trump, bright and early on January 1, 2018.
  • Trump's blistering words didn't go down well with anyone in Pakistan. Asif, in fact, responded almost immediately to Trump's tweet, also on Twitter.

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