Current Affairs : International
 

  • A 500-year-old painting believed to be by Leonardo da Vinci sold for $450.3 million in New York on 15 Nov, smashing a new world record for the most expensive work of art sold at auction, Christie's said.
  • The stunning price for "Salvator Mundi," which depicts Jesus Christ, more than doubled the previous record of $179.4 million paid for Pablo Picasso's "The Women of Algiers (Version O)" in New York in 2015.
  • Lost for years only to resurface at a regional US auction in 2005, Christie's says it is one of fewer than 20 Da Vinci paintings generally accepted as being from the Renaissance master's own hand.
  • All the others are held in museum or institutional collections.Dated by Christie's to around 1500, the oil on panel sold after 19 minutes of frenzied bidding in a historic sale, the star lot of the November art season in the US financial capital.
  • The price throws shade at its Russian billionaire seller, who has sued a Swiss art dealer in Monaco for allegedly swindling him into parting with $127.5 million for the work in 2013.
  • The exact value of private sales are often not revealed. But a Willem de Kooning painting and a Gauguin were reportedly sold separately for $300 million each in 2015, according to US media reports.
  • The Da Vinci depicts a half-length figure of Jesus, holding a crystal orb in his left hand as he raises his right in benediction.

  • Zimbabwe was on a knife's edge on Thursday after the military seized power+ in what it dubbed a targeted operation against "criminals" in the entourage of President Robert Mugabe, who has ruled the southern African nation for almost four decades.
  • It was not clear whether the apparent military coup would bring a formal end to the 93-year-old Mugabe's rule. The main goal of the generals appeared to be preventing Mugabe's wife Grace, 41 years his junior, from succeeding him.
  • Local media reported South Africa's defence and state security ministers, dispatched by President Jacob Zuma as regional envoys, arrived in Zimbabwe's capital, Harare, on Wednesday night and were expected to meet both Mugabe and the military. Their ultimate goal was not clear.
  • Zuma earlier called for "calm and restraint" and asked the defence forces "to ensure that peace and stability are not undermined in Zimbabwe," South Africa's neighbour, which has lurched from crisis to crisis over the past two decades.
  • The South African presidency said Mugabe had told Zuma over the phone that he was confined to his home but was otherwise fine and the military said it was keeping him and his family safe.

  • The richest 1 per cent of people in the world now own half of the planet's wealth, according to a new report that highlights breathtaking levels of global inequality.
  • The study reveals how the super-rich have profited from the aftermath of the 2008 global financial crisis, seeing their proportion of the world's wealth increase from 42.5 per cent in the midst of the crisis to 50.1 per cent now.
  • According to the Credit Suisse Global Wealth Report, the top 1 per cent are now worth a total of £106 trillion - around eight times more than the size of the US economy. The wealthiest 10 per cent of people, meanwhile, own 87.8 per cent of global wealth.
  • "The downward trend reversed after 2008 and the share of the top 1 per cent has been on an upward path ever since, passing the 2000 level in 2013 and achieving new peaks every year thereafter," the report says.
  • The gaping inequality has resulted in a huge rise in the number of millionaires and ultra-high-net-worth individuals (those worth more than $30m). Since 2000, the number of millionaires in the world has risen by 170 per cent, to 36 million, while the number of ultra-high-net-worth individuals has increased five times over.
  • The UK has the third highest number of millionaires - 6 per cent of the total.The report states: "Increasing inequality can boost the speed at which new millionaires are created."At the other extreme, the poorest half of the world's population - 3.5 billion people - own just 2.7 per cent of global wealth, which grew faster in the last year than at any time since 2010, reaching a total of $280 trillion.

  • India is a natural ally of the US due to their shared commitment to democracy and counter-terrorism, according to a senior White House official who said the bilateral relationship is going to get stronger and better under the Trump administration.
  • White House principal deputy press secretary Raj Shah's remarks came hours after Prime Minister Narendra Modi and US President Donald Trump held a meeting in Manila on the sidelines of the ASEAN Summit.
  • The two countries are going to have a "strong relationship and it's going to get stronger" under this president, Shah, the highest-ranking Indian-American ever in the White House press wing, told a group of Indian reporters on 13 Nov.
  • "India is a natural ally of the United States, because of the shared commitment to democracy and to counterterrorism, and because the region is so vital to the US security," he said.
  • Shah said that the US-India relationship should stand on its own leg and "not be contingent" on any other relationship.

  • The 'Free Balochistan' campaign has now found its way to London, with more than a 100 buses carrying advertisements that say "Free Balochistan", "Save The Baloch People" and "Stop Enforced Disappearances", reported ANI.
  • Pakistan is, of course, not happy.The campaign started early this month+ with posters exposing atrocities committed by Pakistan in the Baloch region being splashed across taxis. It was launched by the World Baloch Organization (WBO) and is gaining strength despite Pakistan's desperate attempts to nip it in the bud.
  • Already, the Pakistan government has complained to the UK envoy in Islamabad. Following pressure from it on the UK foreign office, Transport for London ordered the removal of the advertisement from the city's famous black cabs.
  • Still, on November 13, which is celebrated as Baloch Martyrs Day, the WBO upped the ante and moved its campaign to London's buses.
  • Pakistani officials have labeled the campaign as "malicious" and "anti-Pakistan." This is not the first time a peaceful advertising campaign such as this one has irked Pakistan.
  • Baloch leaders and WBO members had protested the removal of their slogans from London's black cabs. They claimed it was an attack on their freedom of expression and that Pakistan was acting like a bully by stifling and censoring the voices of Baloch people.

  • Prime Minister Narendra Modi on 13 Nov made a strong pitch for greater cooperation between India and the ASEAN (Association of Southeast Asia Nations), which would power both regions to mutual economic growth and overall development.
  • "In the near future, south Asia and southeast Asia will be the development engine of the world," PM Modi said at the ASEAN business and investment summit in Manila, Philippines.
  • "Government of India's 'Act East policy' puts this (ASEAN) region at the centre of our engagement," he added.PM Modi went on to say that the task of transforming the country is proceeding at an "unprecedented scale" and invited the 10-member bloc to participate in India's growth story.
  • The prime minister said the focus of his government has been to make India a global manufacturing hub and initiatives like Start Up India and Stand Up India ensure to make youngsters job creators, and not merely job seekers.
  • Speaking about the reforms that are changing the economic landscape of India, PM Modi said demonetisation has transformed India into a less-cash economy while the unified tax regime of GST has given a huge boost to the ease of doing business in the country.

  • Donald Trump shook hands on 13 Nov with a smiling Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte, a man who boasts about personally killing people and who is waging a drug war that rights groups say involves mass murder.
  • The US leader is in Manila with leaders of 18 other nations for two days of summits, the final leg of a headline- grabbing Asian tour dominated by the North Korean nuclear crisis.
  • Allegations of Russian meddling in last year's US presidential elections have also hounded the second half of his 12-day trip, which took him from Japan to South Korea, China and Vietnam
  • Rights groups have called on Trump to end his Asian journey with a strong statement against Duterte's drugs war, which has seen police and suspected vigilantes kill thousands of people.But brief encounters between them in the lead-up to official talks scheduled for late this morning appeared to support Duterte's confidence that Trump was not concerned with the killings
  • Trump shook hands with Duterte, then the pair chatted for about 30 seconds as the Philippine leader smiled broadly, before the opening ceremony for the first summit this morning. Trump had his back to the cameras.

  • With China's controversial military buildup likely to be a major issue at the ASEAN summit, Premier Li Keqiang on Sunday clearly reiterated Beijing's long-held position that it wants to bilaterally resolve its disputes with its neighbours over the South China Sea.
  • In an article published in leading newspapers here, Li admitted that the bilateral relationship between China and the Philippines had "encountered a setback" due to the South China Sea issue but it was back on track due to appropriate handling of the issue by the two sides.
  • The Chinese premier, who is in Manila for the ASEAN and East Asia summits, said Beijing will actively explore joint development of the South China sea to make it a "sea of cooperation and friendship" for the benefit of the two countries.
  • "China will work with the Philippines to continue to properly handle the maritime issues through friendly bilateral consultation by giving full play to such mechanisms as the Bilateral Consultation Mechanism on the South China Sea," Li wrote.
  • Ahead of the annual summit of the ASEAN, an influential grouping of 10 South East Asian countries, a number of diplomats said the thorny issue of China's aggressive military buildup in the South China Sea may be one of the focus areas of the deliberations on Tuesday.
  • China claims sovereignty over all of South China Sea, a huge source of hydrocarbons. However, several ASEAN member countries including Vietnam, the Philippines and Brunei have counter claims.

  • Vijay Upadhayaya, the first Indian to compose classical western music on Chinese cultural themes, will be presenting his 60-member orchestra at a Beijing auditorium on 14 november. The composition, which Upadhayaya will present, was commissioned by the government backed China National Symphony Orchestra and Chorus.
  • "on 13 Nov, we will present symphonic music for large orchestra that reflect Chinese philosophy and use some of the Chinese musical instruments," Upadhyaya told "We will also use the traditional way of Chinese singing where music follows the tones of the language."
  • Lucknow-born Upadhyaya will conduct it with 90 musicians in the orchestra and 70 singers in the chorus. Almost all of them are Chinese barring 11 Europeans, who joined him from Vienna. Upadhyaya will present a 75-minute symphony, Chang'an Men, which traces Chinese musical traditions in different states of history and an opera.
  • "We will present an opera which goes back to Chinese vocal traditions, which has been neglected for decades until recent years," the composer said.
  • Chang'an Men incorporates compilations by Confucius, 6th century poems from The Book of Songs called Shi Jing, a traditional Nanyin song, and text written by Chinese sage Lao Tse.

  • Vijay Upadhayaya, the first Indian to compose classical western music on Chinese cultural themes, will be presenting his 60-member orchestra at a Beijing auditorium on 14 november. The composition, which Upadhayaya will present, was commissioned by the government backed China National Symphony Orchestra and Chorus.
  • "on 13 Nov, we will present symphonic music for large orchestra that reflect Chinese philosophy and use some of the Chinese musical instruments," Upadhyaya told "We will also use the traditional way of Chinese singing where music follows the tones of the language."
  • Lucknow-born Upadhyaya will conduct it with 90 musicians in the orchestra and 70 singers in the chorus. Almost all of them are Chinese barring 11 Europeans, who joined him from Vienna. Upadhyaya will present a 75-minute symphony, Chang'an Men, which traces Chinese musical traditions in different states of history and an opera.
  • "We will present an opera which goes back to Chinese vocal traditions, which has been neglected for decades until recent years," the composer said.
  • Chang'an Men incorporates compilations by Confucius, 6th century poems from The Book of Songs called Shi Jing, a traditional Nanyin song, and text written by Chinese sage Lao Tse.

  • President Donald Trump stood before a summit of Asian leaders keen on regional trade pacts and delivered a roaring "America first" message Friday, denouncing China for unfair trade practices just a day after he had heaped praise on President Xi Jinping in Beijing.
  • "We are not going to let the United States be taken advantage of anymore," Trump told CEOs on the sidelines of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation conference. "I am always going to put America first, the same way that I expect all of you in this room to put your countries first."
  • The president who pulled the United States out of the Pacific Rim trade pact known as the Trans-Pacific Partnership said the US would no longer join "large agreements that tie our hands, surrender our sovereignty and make meaningful enforcement practically impossible."
  • Instead, he said, the US will pursue one-on-one trade deals with other nations that pledge fair and reciprocal trade.
  • As for China, Trump said he'd spoken "openly and directly" with Xi about the nation's abusive trade practices and "the enormous trade deficits they have produces with the United States

  • Behind a glass door inside Al Madina Mosque, Ashfaq Siddique stands at ramrod attention, his eyes darting. He is the mosque's guiding spirit.
  • He is also a former policeman with Scotland Yard. He is scanning live feeds from 36 closed-circuit cameras that monitor everything from the prayer hall to the ablutions room. He is searching for trouble.
  • None in the parking lot, where white nativists routinely throw nails over the walls to puncture the car tires of those praying inside. Nor in the main hall, where Islamic extremists have sometimes argued against democracy with mainstream imams.
  • This morning, the problem is overcrowding. So many Muslims now live in the working-class East London neighborhood of Barking that roughly 9,000 people attended the morning prayer sessions in early September to begin the holiday of Eid al-Adha.
  • "Upstairs is filling up start moving them to the upper hall of the community center!" Siddique, 50, shouts into a yellow walkie-talkie.
  • Few, if any, major Western cities have been more open to Muslims than London. More than 12 percent of Londoners are Muslim. Eighteen months ago, this became the first Western capital to elect a Muslim mayor, a milestone for residents proud of their multicultural ethos.

  • The first hint that something was amiss came in a letter. On Saturday November 4, guests at Riyadh's are restored."
  • The purge was already under way. Within hours security forces had rounded up dozens of members of Saudi Arabia's political and business elite, mostly in the capital and the coastal city of Jeddah. Among them were 11 princes as well as ministers and wealthy tycoons.
  • Some were invited to meetings where they were detained. Others were arrested at their homes and flown to Riyadh or driven to the Ritz Carlton, which has been turned into a temporary prison.
  • The detainees were allowed a single, brief phone call home, a person familiar with the arrests told Reuters.
  • "They don't receive calls and are kept under tight security. No one can go in or out," the insider said. "It is obvious that there was a lot of preparation for it."
  • The purge was ordered by 32-year-old Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman. Officially next in line to the throne to his father, King Salman, he is now in effect running the country which he has said he will transform into a modern state.

  • Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and Chinese President Xi Jinping have agreed to deepen cooperation between the two countries on North Korea, Abe said on Saturday after meeting Xi.
  • They also agreed to accelerate talks for an early implementation of a communication mechanism between their military forces, and to hold a trilateral summit with South Korea at the earliest possible date, Abe told reporters.
  • The two leaders met on the sidelines of the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit in Vietnam.
  • Abe said Xi had told him the meeting marked a "new start of Japan-China relation

  • India and Prime Minister Narendra Modi today got an unexpected and huge thumbs up from Donald Trump in his trademark hyperbolic style. China, on the other hand, got a tongue lashing from the US President.
  • Trump commended India for being the world's largest democracy and for achieving "astounding" growth He praised PM Modi for bringing the country's people "together as one very, very successfully". At the same time, in what was seen as sharp rebuke to China, Trump railed against trade practices he said have put Americans out of work and warned that the US would no longer ``turn a blind eye'' to trade abuses, reported AP.
  • Trump made these comments at an address at the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit of chief executives in Vietnam, where he arrived earlier 10 Nov from a trip in China
  • The US President's laudatory comments about India and PM Modi come just months after a very successful maiden meeting between the two leaders in Washington in August.
  • "India is celebrating its 70th anniversary. It's a sovereign democracy, as well as think of this (one) of over one billion people," said the US President 10 Nov, with the flourish he has come to be known for. "It's the largest democracy in the world," he added.

  • Saudi Arabia arrested 11 princes, including a prominent billionaire, and dozens of current and former ministers, reports said, in a sweeping crackdown as the kingdom's young crown prince consolidates power.
  • Separately, the head of the Saudi National Guard, once a leading contender to the throne, as well as the navy chief and the economy minister were replaced in a series of high-profile sackings that sent shock waves in the kingdom.
  • The development came just hours after a new anti-corruption commission, headed by powerful Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, was established by royal decree late on 4 Nov.
  • Saudi-owned Al Arabiya television reported that the princes, four current and dozens of former ministers were arrested as the commission launched a probe into floods that devastated the Red Sea city of Jeddah in 2009 and the deadly outbreak of the Mers virus some years ago.
  • State-run Saudi Press Agency said the commission's goal was to "preserve public money, punish corrupt people and those who exploit their positions".
  • Saudi billionaire Prince Al-Waleed bin Talal was among those arrested, Saudi news websites said though there was no official confirmation. The prince was not immediately reachable for comment.
  • An aviation source told AFP that security forces had grounded private jets in the Red Sea city of Jeddah, potentially to prevent any high-profile figures from leaving.
  • "The breadth and scale of the arrests appears to be unprecedented in modern Saudi history," said Kristian Ulrichsen, a fellow at the Baker Institute for Public Policy at Rice University.

  • US President Donald Trump's official Twitter handle was on 2 Nov.temporarily deactivated for 11 minutes by an employee of the microblogging site, sending social media into overdrive, with some even hailing the employee as an 'American hero'.
  • The President is known for his aggressive and self-asserting style on the microblogging platform.
  • The news of his account getting deactivated instantly became the talking point on social media, with several people posting tongue-in-cheek messages.
  • Mashable, for one, termed the Twitter employee "an American hero".Alluding to the travel ban imposed by the US President, one Twitter user suggested a permanent Twitter ban on the President.

  • Scientists have found a full 20 new planets that could support life, suggesting there are more habitable worlds out there than we'd thought. The new findings come from NASA's Kepler mission to discover alien worlds like our own, able to support alien or potentially ourselves in the future. And they are some of the most optimistic findings yet, suggesting new breakthroughs in our attempt to find "Earth 2.0".
  • The 20 new planets could be our best chance yet of finding alien worlds able to support life, according to scientists who have reviewed the major new research. Some of the new worlds are remarkably similar to our own, avoiding the common differences that make it less likely they could really support life.
  • Many have years that are notably similar to ours and so avoid the problems of the "short" years that often cause problems for other planets, and seem to have temperatures very similar to our very life-encouraging climate.
  • The most encouraging of those planets has been called KOI-7923.0, and might be the best chance yet for finding another Earth. Its year lasts 395 days, and it is 97 per cent the size of Earth, but a little colder. It's colder because it's further from the sun, and that sun is a little less warm. But it's not a vast difference it probably just means that the warmer parts of that planet are more akin to the colder parts of ours.
  • "If you had to choose one to send a spacecraft to, it's not a bad option," Jeff Coughlin, a team leader on the Kepler project and one of the scientists who found the new planets, told the New Scientist, which first reported the news.

  • The US will not tolerate Pakistan providing safe havens to terrorists, America's envoy to the UN Nikki Haley has said and backed the creation of a strategic alliance with India to fight terrorism and maintain peace and stability in the India-Pacific region.
  • Haley, in her keynote address to the 20th annual Legislative Conference of the Indian American Friendship Council, also strongly condemned the terrorist attack in New York that killed eight persons.
  • She said that the US recently embarked on a new strategy for combating terrorism in Afghanistan and South Asia. One of the pillars of that strategy is the development of America's strategic partnership with India.
  • "America's overriding interest in Afghanistan and throughout South Asia are to eliminate the terrorist safe havens that threaten US and to keep nuclear weapons out of the hands of terrorists," Haley said.
  • The US, she said, would use all the elements of its national power, economic diplomatic and military to pursue these goals."And critically, we will look to our economic and security partnerships with India to help us.
  • We expect India to do more in Afghanistan, particularly in economic and development assistance," she said.

  • A US trade advocacy group focused on India has sought a "truly fair and bilateral" trade between the two countries, days after India and the US conducted its Trade Policy Forum and Commercial Dialogue.
  • "A truly fair and bilateral US-India trade partnership would have the potential to reap monumental economic benefits for both countries, including increased innovation and job creation," the Alliance for Fair Trade with India (AFTI) said in a statement on 30 oct
  • "AFTI and its members welcome bilateral discussions between US and India to improve and strengthen the countries' economic and trade relationship. However, neither the Trade Policy Forum nor the Commercial Dialogue resulted in specific concrete actions to address challenges for US businesses and manufacturers exporting to or operating in India," it said.
  • US industries want to see a more robust US-India commercial relationship and increased US-India trade, it added."But it "must see concrete efforts to address issues" in India that limit market access and undermine their competitiveness, including price controls, forced localisation, technical barriers to trade and intellectual property barriers," it said.

  • Saudi Arabia will allow women into sports stadiums for the first time from next year, authorities said on 29 oct, in a landmark move opening up three previously male-only venues to families
  • The kingdom, which has some of the world's tightest restrictions on women, has long barred women from sports arenas by strict rules on segregation of the sexes in public.
  • The announcement is in line with powerful Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman's ambitious reform drive shaking up the ultra-conservative kingdom, including the historic decision to allow women to drive from next June.
  • "Starting the preparation of three stadiums in Riyadh, Jeddah and Damman to be ready to accommodate families from early 2018," the General Sports Authority said on Twitter.
  • Restaurants, cafes and monitor screens would be set up inside the stadiums, the authority added.Last month hundreds of women were allowed to enter a sports stadium in Riyadh, used mostly for football matches, for the first time to mark Saudi Arabia's national day.
  • Under the country's guardianship system, a male family member normally the father, husband or brother must grant permission for a woman's study, travel and other activities.

  • The amount of carbon dioxide in the earth's atmosphere grew at record rate in 2016 to a level not seen for millions of years, potentially fuelling a 20-metre rise in sea levels and adding 3 degrees to temperatures, the United Nations said on 30 oct.
  • Atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2), the main man-made greehouse gas, hit 403.3 parts per million (ppm), up from 400.0 in 2015, the UN World Meteorological Organization said in its annual Greenhouse Gas Bulletin.
  • That growth rate was 50 per cent faster than the average over the past decade, driving CO2 levels 45 per cent above pre-industrial levels and further outside the range of 180-280 ppm seen in recent cycles of ice ages and warmer periods.
  • "On 30 oct. CO2 concentration of ~400 ppm exceeds the natural variability seen over hundreds of thousands of years," the WMO bulletin said.
  • The latest data adds to the urgency of a meeting in Bonn next month, when environment ministers from around the world will work on guidelines for the Paris climate accord backed by 195 countries in 2015.
  • The agreement is already under pressure because US President Donald Trump has said he plans to pull the United States out of the deal, which seeks to limit the rise in temperatures to "well below" 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 Fahrenheit) above pre-industrial times.

  • India and France have decided to further crank up military-to-military ties, including joint combat exercises, as well as enhance cooperation in maritime security and counter-terrorism towards expanding their bilateral strategic partnership.
  • The delegation-level meeting led by defence minister Nirmala Sitharaman and her French counterpart Florence Parly, who is here in the run-up to President Emmanuel Macron's visit to India in December, on 27 oct also agreed to "strongly support" projects for defence manufacturing under the "Make in India" initiative as well as promote defence technology and R&D cooperation.
  • In an exclusive interview with Timess of india on 26oct, Parly had said France would take "into account your country's legitimate interest of having 'Make in India' components" if India decides to go in for another 36 Rafale fighters, after the first 36 jets are delivered to IAF by 2022 under the Rs 59,000 crore deal inked in September last year.
  • French Naval Group-DCNS, of course, is also among the four contenders for Project-75 (India), under which six advanced stealth submarines are to be built in India through collaboration between a foreign ship-builder and an Indian shipyard for an estimated Rs 70,000 crore.
  • The French armament company is already involved in the construction of six Scorpene submarines at Mazagon Docks in Mumbai under the over Rs 23,000 crore Project-75.

  • Powered by businesses and consumers, the US economy grew at a solid 3 annual pace last quarter despite two devastating hurricanes evidence of economic durability and all but assuring that the Federal Reserve will resume raising interest rates late this year.
  • on 27 oct figures from the government marked the first time in three years that the economy has expanded at a 3 percent or more annual rate historically, a normal pace for a healthy economy for two straight quarters.
  • More than eight years since the Great Recession officially ended, the economy is still posting consistent gains in the job market, in business investment, in consumer spending and corporate earnings.
  • Unemployment is at a 16-year low. Companies are restocking. An improving global economy is boosting US exports. Stock prices are rising in tandem with company profits.
  • The 3 percent annual growth for the July-September quarter in gross domestic product the total output of goods and services produced in the United States followed a 3.1 percent annual pace in the previous quarter. It was the strongest two-quarter showing since 2014.

  • Maruti Suzuki India, the country's biggest carmaker, said on Friday it planned to build electric cars as the government strives to electrify all new vehicles by 2030, though it didn't give a timeline for the process.
  • Maruti Suzuki's chairman said there was still no clear roadmap on how the government aimed to achieve its target and a lot would depend on that.
  • "We will make electric cars but I can't give you the date just now because it is all very much a work in progress," R.C. Bhargava told reporters, after the company posted a 3 percent rise in quarterly profit, beating analysts' estimates
  • India is working on a new auto policy that promotes the use of electric cars, and a draft is likely to be made public before the end of the year. This is a shift from an earlier policy that promoted hybrid and electric vehicles.
  • Sales of electric cars in India remain negligible, however, mainly due to the high cost of batteries which make the vehicles expensive and out of reach for many buyers in a country where cars are as cheap as 250,000 rupees ($3,800). A lack of charging stations also makes the whole proposition unviable for now.
  • Maruti's parent, Suzuki Motor Corp, has electric car technology which it can provide, Bhargava said, adding the Japanese company was also in talks with Toyota Motor Corp to form an alliance which may include sharing technologies like hybrid and electric.
  • Maruti dominates the small car market in India and has been launching more premium vehicles as competition heats up with newer and planned entrants such as Kia Motors and SAIC Motor Corp.

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